Grip and Grin: Some Tips on Taking Photos with Your Prized Catch

Photos keep the memories of a great trip alive forever, especially when you landed that fish of a lifetime.  Nowadays with digital cameras and computer programs that let even those with novice level skills make great looking photos, you still need to get a great shot to start with.  When its time for the “grip and grin” on one of my trips, guys get a little frustrated with me and how particular I am about how they hold their fish.

“Its not about deception or trying to make the fish look bigger, its about balance and composition.”  I tell them.  “Wash the blood off the deck and the fish, and turn it the other way so we don’t see the gaff mark.”  After saying these things I get dirty looks and heavy sighs.  Amazing when a few days after the trip I send them that one photo that came out just right they admit its as important as I make it sound.  Take the time, and you just might get that wall hanger or magazine cover shot you always wanted.  You will forget what a pain it was to take the time and get the perfect shot in the end.

Try to take the photo right after the fish was caught to preserve the vibrant colors and true emotions of the angler, and get an interesting background.  While is admirable to try and hide your secret spot, the fish won’t be there in a week so go ahead and get it in the photo.   Don’t be afraid to have two or more people in the photo, as faces make a picture more interesting.  Be aware of things that create shadows like the boat or hats and vizors, but even some of those things can be tweaked when editing.   Try to hide your hands and arms, as they are not interesting and might make a big fish look smaller than it really is.  Remember:  Right hand/right gill……..Left hand/left gill.  This will keep your hands from either being twisted backwards or in front of the fish.   Experiment with angles and depth, as a straight up and down fish looks flat and lifeless.

 

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Face blended in with the background, fish has blood all over it and my hands really show how small this 10 pound seabass really is. No way this picture is going on the wall or any magazine.

On a recent trip I grabbed one of the small seabass and had Joe Davis take a few shots to show how most photo poses make for less than desirable results.

Another common failure.  Zero balance with the fish sticking out to one side, and my hand is on the wrong side of the fish.  I get this pose quite often and guys simply do not understand what I mean when I say "No, put your hand on the other side of the fish."

Another common failure. Zero balance with the fish sticking out to one side, and my hand is on the wrong side of the fish. I get this pose quite often and guys simply do not understand what I mean when I say “No, put your hand on the other side of the fish.”

 

Getting better, but still an epic fail.  My left hand is behind the fish, and that is where its supposed to be.  This is not a photograph of my hands, its of a white seabass.  My right hand is on the left side of the fish, ruining everything that might work with this photo.

Getting better, but still an epic fail. My left hand is behind the fish, and that is where its supposed to be. This is not a photograph of my hands, its of a white seabass. My right hand is on the left side of the fish, ruining everything that might work with this photo.

Now here is the same fish, caught the night before.  I did not take any special steps to wash the fish or smack the sides to bring back the color.  I simply held the fish in a balanced way, and made sure the background did not take away from the details, yet still adds composition and makes it more interesting.

 

This is a close as one can get with a 12 hour old small fish.  Hands hidden, symmetry and interesting background.

This is a close as one can get with a 12 hour old small fish. Hands hidden, symmetry and interesting background.

 Now take the time to get good shots and you’ll be happy with the results.  I purposefully used a small seabass that was not a great candidate for a good photo as an example of what a difference it makes in how you hold your prized catch.  Add the rod and reel, other anglers and better lighting on the face, and the odds of a great photo just get better. To get one good shot I take hundreds of photos.  This is meant as an example of how to improve the odds of getting a “wall hanger”, so imagine if this fish was still alive and much bigger!  First things first, you still need to get out and catch a fish worth taking a picture of.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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