Light Line Old School?

Abu Garcia Revo Toro with matching Volatile Rod.

Abu Garcia Revo Toro with matching Volatile Rod.

Some serious advances have occurred with the tackle today, leaps and bounds really.  Reels have butter smooth drags that last and last, fluorocarbon leaders and Spectra have changed the way we fish completely, yet some things remain the same.  All this wonderful technology means nothing if you never hook a fish.  To get that fish you are targeting to bite you need to pick that perfect bait, make a long cast and use all your senses to make that opportunity into a reality.  The question is, when you do everything right and don’t get the bite, then what?

You drop down in line class, that’s what.

Yellowtail on light line.  Braid cut the kelp to get this fish.

Yellowtail on light line. Braid cut the kelp to get this fish.

There is a whole new generation of anglers now that read that last sentence and cringed.  What with all the fancy reels with smooth drags and teflon/boron composite super rods that make fishing almost unfair, why not?  Did the reel manufacturers make these state of the art drag systems for fishing 80#?  Yes, the new gear is capable of fishing heavy line but it really shines when you fish the lighter stuff.  With heavy line you don’t even need drag, so why the dirty looks when someone breaks out the 20#?

Whether you are on your own boat or a charter, everyone wants to catch lots of big fish.  When the moon and the stars align perfectly and that once in a lifetime wide open ripper happens you can break out the broomstick with 100# and put the wood to them.

 Break out the 80# when they are chewing!!!

Break out the 80# when they are chewing!!!

How often does that happen, really?  Most of the time we are just trying to get picked up, and land that one big fish for a snapshot and bragging rights.  Finding that perfect leader that is neither too heavy to get a bite, or too light to land the fish is what you are looking for, and it may change from spot to spot, minute to minute.  That is why we have so many different outfits and not just the one with 80#.

Spectra brings light line fishing to a whole new level.  65# braid is like fishing 20# mono in both feel and line capacity.  Its not uncommon to see calico bass guys with high tech gear that looks much like the freshwater largemouth arsenal on steroids with 65# or even 80# braid.  Then add in the abrasion resistance and low visibility of fluorocarbon leader and “presto”, its a whole new ballgame.  That does not automatically mean you will get the same amount of bites on 40# as you would on 20#.  The whole package with 20# fluoro is still miles ahead of an old school outfit with the same line in mono.  You have less stretch, more pulling power, kelp cutting capabilities and abrasion resistance far beyond what was available only a few years ago.

What is missing today is anglers that actually know how to fight a fish from bite to gaff, therefore we get guys that insist on fishing the heavy lines.  More than ever I see guys take that $400 rod with all the technology and point the tip at the fish and grind away, wondering why the fish spit the hook halfway to the boat.  Lift your tip!  The fish did not get away, you lost it.  I can see why charter boat Captains are screaming at passengers to “fish nothing less than 50!!!”  They are sick and tired of putting the boat on the fish only to see most of what is hooked, lost.  It all comes down to a lack of talent, period.

When you hook that big seabass or yellow on a kelpline and it gets its head down and swims right into the kelp, loosen the drag.  Let the tackle do its job.  The braid will only cut the kelp if its moving, you’ll need to let the fish run and tire before you begin the tug of war.  Even then its more of a seesaw battle, with you pulling for a while, then the fish pulling for a while.  Its the back and forth of the braid on the kelp that does the cutting, while straight pulling hard causes heartaches.

Light line seabass.  This one went right into the kelp, and came out after a long seesaw battle.  Heavier line never got bit at all.

Light line seabass. This one went right into the kelp, and came out after a long seesaw battle. Heavier line never got bit at all.

 My grandfather used to call this, “playing the fish.”  He’d say it while fighting a 120# bigeye on 25#, then my Uncle would gaff it.  We’re talking Penn Jigmasters with plastic spools.  I can still hear the “THUD” of the fish hitting the deck, time and time again.

Its become a common conversation for me, some guy saying “why would you even use 15# when fishing for seabass?”  I find myself in defense mode when its the guy pointing the finger that needs angling lessons.  I’ve driven the boat for a lady angler that got a striped marlin to the boat on 6# for a tag and release.  (We got that fish in 27 minutes)  Most angling clubs don’t even recognize anything caught with line over 30#, and the Tuna Club of Avalon encourages its members to fish with linen line in 3 and 6 thread sizes (like 6# and 15# respectively).  At last years Avalon Tuna Club Seabass tourney I caught a 22 pound seabass on 6 thread linen, and didn’t even place in the top 10!

22lbs on the Avalon Pier.  Fish was caught on 6 thread linen.

22lbs on the Avalon Pier. Fish was caught on 6 thread linen.

 

 

Not much ever changes back to where it was, but light line fishing is being seriously overlooked these days.  With the hotbed of young kids today out making a name for themselves through websites, videos and social networking it sure would be nice to see one take on the challenges of light line angling skills.  I can hook and hand seabass and yellows on 30# all day and most get gaffed, but when I hook one on 12 or 15#, its mine.  I tie good knots, test them all and lift my tip.  In the end, its me getting the typical “grip-n-grin” photo taken with a fish heavier that the line it was hooked on.  The guy taking the picture probably never got a bite, and was fishing 40#.  Fishing seabass on 50# is like fishing trout with 20#.  Tie good knots and learn how to actually fight a fish and use the tackle to its full potential.  You’ll not only hook (and land) more fish, but have way more fun doing it.

36# seabass on 15# fluoro in shallow water.  No problem.

36# seabass on 15# fluoro in shallow water. No problem.

 

Gettin’ Hard in the Surf

 

Some fisherman adapt really well.  With high fuel costs and the MLPA closures, a few have changed their tactics with huge success.  Others (like myself) have continued to try to make chicken soup out of chicken poop (wintertime seabass fishing) and run our wallets dry only to have empty freezers.  FaceBook was plastered with huge coastal seabass from late spring through this summer, and photos of dorado and bluefin tuna were posted almost every few minutes until things started to wind down.

Now the FB reports are surprisingly interesting, with guys like lokey Kingfisher and his float tube “Jungle Fishing” photos of spotted bay bass, sculpin and rockfish.  “Econo-Fishing” is now all the rage, and last weeks FISH TALK RADIO show  (Thursdays @10pm Am830)  was an hour of float tube and kayak fishing and a total hit with listeners.  Even the ridiculous cost to park along the coast seems reasonable with fishing as good as Lokey and his buddies get it.

Last night I saw on FaceBook that my friend Captain Larry Moore decided to go surf fishing very near my house in Huntington Beach.  I figured I would grab my camera and head down to snap a few photos for an article.  Sounded great, especially since the last time I wrote anything was when the tuna were still biting in one day range.  Little did I know that I would witness something truly different, and my author juices would be flowing on the short drive home.

Captain Ed Leland had invited Larry this morning and Ed is quite the accomplished surf angler.  Dorie, Larry’s girlfriend was there too, and all three were busy catching barred surf perch when I arrived about an hour after they did.  “It was wide open a while ago, during the slack high tide,” Larry said to me.  It was still good and they were taking turns catching perch from small to keeper size on Berkley “GULP” Camo Sand Worms.  Larry grabbed my camera and handed me his rod and said “here, catch one.”  I did and he snapped a photo for good measure.  Then things started to get interesting.

Ed tied on a hard “Jerk bait” and began casting.  Third cast he was bit and after a short but tough battle, landed a fat surf perch.  “WOW!”  Not long after that Ed hooked another big boy and Larry was off to tie on a hard bait of his own.  Dorie and Larry fished side by side and both caught perch, only the ones Larry caught on the hard bait were easily twice the size, and “hit like a ton of bricks” larry said.  I couldn’t help but wonder what I had been missing all these years by fishing small grubs for surf perch and not hard baits.

 

I snapped photos of Larry catching 4 more nice big perch, and Ed a couple.  Even when I got cold and decided to head for the car, Larry hooked another and I wondered what I would miss by leaving.  The saltwater tournament bass guys have revealed the benefits of fishing hard baits and the crossover from freshwater to salt.  New baits are available today that are made to endure the saltwater environment, and the one Larry was fishing was around 2-3 ounces and casted into the morning southeast breeze easily.

I have no doubt that most local anglers have no idea the bounty that awaits them in the surf.  The tackle is inexpensive, and your existing trout gear works perfect.  Parking is likely to be the most expensive part of the surf fishing adventure, but doesn’t even compare to the cost of any So. Cal. boat launch facility.  Perch are plentiful year round, but more so some times than others.  They are very good eating and there is a very real possibility of catching a halibut, corbina or spotfin croaker.

While I’d love to go into the specifics about what hard baits to use in the surf, I actually have no idea what works best.  Today was the first I’d even HEARD of this, and am still blown away that these perch were trying to eat such a large artificial.  Ed and I discussed how these baits may mimic smelt or grunion, so blues and greens would be a good choice.  I imagine that after a full moon lunar period when the grunion are running, this would be deadly on halibut.  I really expected to see fouled hooks on the line from casting into the breeze, but I never saw it once.  Both Larry and Ed were lightly touching the line as it came off the reel during each cast, and that looked to be enough to hold the lure straight and keep it’s three sets of treble hooks from snagging the line.  

So if you are anything like me and sometimes just get the itch to pull on a fish without the hassles associated with fishing, consider the surf.  If you want to pull hard on something a little more substantial, grab a hard bait and wing it out there on light tackle.  Adapting to the conditions and making the most of what is available is the core of every good angler.

Fishing Long Beach Harbor

Stormy day halibut inside the breakwall.

I cut my teeth fishing inside Long Beach Harbor.  I was taught how to use visual bearings and line-ups to find hard bottom areas, high relief and even wrecks, and took that knowledge into all the nearshore fishing I do today.  I learned how to figure current and wind directions for a specific spot, and set up on that spot so the transom sits perfectly in position to be able to chum and fish effectively.  This basic principle is instrumental to fishing just about everywhere one might anchor.  Not only did I learn the basic fundamentals here, but I also learned that there are lots of fish to catch in LB Harbor, especially halibut.  Boy, are there a lot of halibut.

Lots of smiles if you learn where to fish.

 

In the early 1960’s the City of Long Beach decided to clean up all the oil derricks along the coastline and build oil drilling islands off the coast (1/2-1 1/2 miles off the beach).   The idea was to construct these islands in a way that not only tapped into one of the biggest oil fields in North America, but make it beautiful as well.  Edge rock was barged over from Catalina Islands now closed West Quarry, and that rock was strategically placed in circular shapes to create and outline four separate islands.  Then, seabed sand was dredged and pumped into the shapes to create the islands that stand today.  Architect Joseph Linesch was hired to design these islands to be both beautiful and functional, and each island was given their names to honor the 1st four astronauts to perish in the US space program.  (Grissom, White, Freeman and Chaffee).  The islands were completed in 1966, but its the way they were dredged and filled that created the dynamic fishery that exists today.

Obviously the constructing of island barriers with quarry rock from Catalina had its follies, and numerous rocks fell short of their mark.  This creates rocky structure we already know makes a fantastic fish haven, and some of these rocks are not on the charts or fished very often.  What really contributes to this fishery is the deep areas and high spots created by the dredging process.  Dredges sent their suction apparatus down and sucked the mud, sand and rock off the bottom, then pumped it through hoses into each of the islands interiors.  As the mud and sand flowed through the dredge hoses, it would create weak spots in that hose for the rock to penetrate and pour out.  The high spots you see on the LB Inner Harbor charts are what happened when the rock poured out through holes in the dredge hose and stacked up in piles on the ocean floor.  Nothing better than a hard bottom high spot next to a deep dredge hole.

These high spots are out away from the islands, and most are on the numerous charts available to the general public today.  They are small, but still easy to find.  An amazing amount of halibut live on the tops of these high spots, waiting for bait to wash over for a quick meal.  I have in the past anchored on these small spots and fished for halibut, with amazing success.  I learned early on that drifting simply does not keep your bait where the fish are long enough to be as effective as anchoring, yet bounce ballers today have great success covering the large flat areas outside of these dredge holes and high spots.  Light tackle works best here, along with the baits that are indigenous to the area and the halibuts favorite foods.  Smelt, herring and tomcod are favorites, but sardines work well too.  Anchovies will get you lots of bites, but a large lizardfish population will frustrate you with small baits.  I have had some success with plastics, but nothing compared to live bait when it comes to big halibut.

There are wrecks in here to find and learn, with opportunities for sand and spotted bay bass, halibut, and even some really good lobster for those who are into hoop netting.  Up against the Northwest, long side of Island Freeman there is a sunken submarine right up against the middle of the rocks.  Its from an old TV show call “Operation Petticoat”, featuring a pink submarine.  Hence the common name for the spot, “The Pink Sub.”  This gets fished a lot, but some good halibut scores come out of here still, especially in the spring and fall.  Another wreck is the “Belmont Wreck”, and this one is even on the charts. I searched extensively for the history of this wreck and found nothing, but what I’ve been told is that it is a small wooden hulled ship that sunk due to a fire.  This spot gets fished heavily and bites are few and far between these days.  Its a great spot to practice setting up however, and the lobster guys do quite well here at night with hoop nets.

Jerry and his son Matt with a “Belmont Wreck” lobster.

I took a client here a couple years ago for lobster and we did very well, but now there are guys on it every night, so the secret is out big time.

LB Harbor is extremely tide sensitive, and during slack low tide times it can be very hard to get a single bite.  Shallow areas and narrow channels get a lot of water movement with the tides, and the openings in the Federal Breakwall are prime spots when the tides are moving in or out.  Bass, halibut and even the occasional legal white seabass can be taken here when the water is moving and bait is present.  The same afternoon winds that can chase you off the Izors or Horseshoe can be very helpful inside the Harbor, creating drifts along productive rocky areas such as Pier J and the Navy Mole.  Again, study the charts to see where quarry rock has tumbled off when the jetty was constructed, or find new ones by metering around on your own.

My mom and I with halibut caught at the Navy Mole, late fall.

 

So take the time and study those Long Beach Harbor charts, its worth your while.  For such a small area geographically, you’ll be amazed to find there is a lifetimes worth of knowledge and possibilities in here.  You can use it as a backup plan for windy days, or take it to the next level and find some great fishing close to home.  We all know the breakwall itself holds millions of calicos and the possibility of a real trophy, but the inside offers as much if not more.  One could write a book on how to fish the Long Beach Inner Harbor, and it would be a thick and comprehensive guide.  I found it very rewarding and productive to learn it on my own, so I will suggest you do the same.  Take the time and explore areas new to you, catch the bait these fish are feeding on, and find out what you’ve been missing all these years.

My sister Marti with an afternoon halibut

One final word on eating the fish you catch from the Long Beach Harbor area.  Tagging studies on halibut and white seabass have shown that these species migrate often and cover long distances.  I have no problem keeping these fish, and feeding them to my family.  Bass however are in question, and this is not the cleanest water in the world to fish in.  I personally release all bass here and inside other harbors such as Huntington and Alamitos Bay.  I don’t have a problem eating the lobsters either.  In a world where we drink too many beers and eat double chili cheeseburgers, a few harbor lobsters are not going to be the food that kills us.  You can use your own discretion.